Why Do Some People Do Well as Vegans and Vegetarians? (Clues From the Magical World of Genetics)

HEY GUYS.

Do you ever wonder why some people seem to do just fine as vegans and vegetarians, while others turn into quivering heaps of deficiency and woe? Does it bug you that the common rationale is either that 1) the “feelin’ good” vegs are either deluding themselves or cheating, or 2) the folks who crash and burn were just doing it wrong?

ME TOO.

So I wrote a guest post looking at why people respond differently to plant-based diets.

Because genetics. And microbes. Yay!

Go take a look-see if this topic interests you:

4 Reasons Why Some People Do Well as Vegans (While Others Fail Miserably)

(Also, I promise—promise—that Low Fat Part 2 is still on its way. One day, when you’re least expecting it, you will wake up and make your scrambled eggs or green smoothie or organic grass-fed lightly seasoned caribou bone broth, check your inbox, and then hate me because I gave you thousands of words you don’t really have time to read. I’m sorry in advance and I love you all.)

11 comments

  1. Hi Denise,

    Thanks for your email. I will read your article with great interest, like I did with your book, articles and speeches posted online. So much so that I regularly quoted you in my (Dutch) book: Weet wat je eet (Know what you eat) – Healthy eating based on the oldest knowledge and the newest science.

    It has a chapter on Weston Price and with 60 pages of footnotes (online to not bother the reader) and it has been well received. Thanks again for your input in several chapters.

    Best, Daan de Wit, Amsterdam, the Netherlands

    >

  2. So how would the average vegan know, before some malady occurred, that they were deficient in an enzyme or gut bug? My hospice patient died of diabetes and dementia.

    The article has an upbeat vibe, but I wonder how much intervention/ monitoring is needed to give reliable and effectual advice? Is there reliable cost effective testing available? Would one get this information from discussion boards or magazines?

    Vegans may well be better nourished than my grandchildren, who at present consume cereals, mac&cheese and Spagetios and chicken nuggets. Hopefully they will develop a hunger for real food.

    ________________________________

  3. You’re the best, Denise. Most objective, trusted writer on food, with no fear-based ideas, no ideology to sell. Right up there with Michael Pollan!

  4. Funny that this notification came in just as I reading your post on Authority Nutrition. Please be sure to take a look at my Disqus comment there. And thank you again!

  5. Interesting read as usual. I guess gut bacteria is really gaining traction in nutritional studies. Looking forward to your next post!

  6. Denise: Thanks again for another fine piece of work. Plus two completely useless but fun factoids: carotenemia and lycopenemia! We thought we had enough diseases to worry about already. Bless you. Looking forward to Low Fat part two.

  7. Thank you! This can explain why my year as a vegan was totally crap (I have ms, so it was a health experiment), the relief I felt in my body when I went back to being an omnivore was palpable.

  8. I’m wondering if you have run across any information about genetic anomalies preventing optimal use of other vitamins, such as D3.

    > Raw Food SOS > October 20, 2016 at 1:34 PM > neisy posted: “HEY GUYS. Do you ever wonder why some people seem to do > just fine as vegans and vegetarians, while others turn into quivering > heaps of deficiency and woe? Does it bug you that the common rationale > is either that 1) the “feelin’ good” vegs are either delu” >

  9. I’ve learned several new things here, but what is most interesting to me is that we have the capacity to convert K1 to K2. Thought it was only ruminants who could do that. This is good news. I have eaten natto intermittently over the past two or three years, but recently threw it all out. My tummy simply doesn’t like legumes. Plus I find it difficult to get past the taste sensors; foul stuff.

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